Why build homes in Jamaica?

Here in the United States, we have many opportunities, whether that means an abundance of jobs or government funding, to help those who are unable to physically work. In Jamaica, this isn’t true. Instead, Jamaicans are left to fend for themselves as best they can. I would imagine this to be true in other countries that we hope to be in soon as well.


What size are the houses and what does it cost to build one?

The typical home we build is twelve feet by fourteen feet, and it’s a far cry from being a forever home. It’s more of a starter home to get out of the elements. Each home we build costs approximately $3,000. The selected families are required to build their home’s foundation, which runs about $1,000. In that way, we ensure they’re invested in their home.


How are the families chosen?

Families are chosen through a series of requirements, and we work with a small group of locals who are strong advocates for what we do. We take their recommendations as they know the individuals and their stories better than we do.


What is each family’s investment in the process?

We require that each family who receives a home to pour their foundation by the time we arrive or they won’t receive a home. This way they have also shown their personal investment in putting a roof over their families heads. We are trying to teach them to fish.


How many people volunteer each year and how are they selected?

Each year is different; however, typically each group will consist of ten-to-twelve people. Selection is easy: if they are willing to put others needs before their own and can take care of their own expenses, we will find a way for them to build homes.


How many houses get built each year?

Dependant on access to the building site, and willingness along with the capability of the team, it is not uncommon to build three homes each week.


What are your long-term plans for the Creators of Hope?

Our long term plan is to house as many families as we can. To achieve this, we budget and work to increase donations, which allows us to build more homes and increase our scope to include more countries of need. One thing I have realized is that many people are looking for the chance to be hands-on doing this work.

Here at Creators of Hope, we add to the experience by having our teams engage with the homes’ recipients and get to know their families. Many of our volunteers also provide donations to further help families with their needs. It’s wonderful to see the excitement of the families as their new home is being constructed—something they would likely never manage to do on their own.


Facts About Jamaica

Jamaica is an island that is located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Since gaining its independence from the United Kingdom in 1962, the country has grown to a population of 2.8 million people. Kingston, the capital, is home to approximately one million of the country’s inhabitants.

Photo credit: Doug Condon, 2019.

The official language of Jamaica is English because the United Kingdom ruled over the country for many centuries. However, the country also recognizes Jamaican Patois as its national language.

The currency is the Jamaican dollar, and its flag is comprised of three main colors. The colors of the Jamaican flag represent the following: Black stands for hardships, green stands for hope and agriculture, and yellow represents the wealth and beauty of the sun. Although Jamaica has no official religion and practices religious freedom, over 64% of Jamaicans are Protestant.

  • Most of the families in Jamaica are headed by women. Mothers are responsible for raising children and supporting their families. The family is of the utmost importance and includes a close-knit web of aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents.
  • Public education in Jamaica is not entirely free, as there are registration fees and other school expenses that are not covered by the government. As a result, many of the nation’s most poor children are not able to attend school.
  • The Jamaican Government is currently working with the UNDP and the European Union to alleviate poverty on both a macro and micro level. Poverty alleviation and achievement of Millennium Development Goals remains a top priority for the Jamaican government.
  • Jamaica’s economy is a mixed economy that focuses on agriculture, tourism, mining, and manufacturing. Over half of its economy comes from tourism.
  • Jamaica’s main agricultural exports include bananas, sugar, and coffee.
  • GDP per capita is $9,200 (2017).
  • Relationships between Jamaican officials and crime groups cause widespread corruption, which results in many of Jamaica’s problems. Corruption not only hurts law-abiding Jamaican citizens but makes foreign investors far more hesitant to get involved in the Jamaican industry.
  • Jamaicans drive on the left side of the road.
  • The country has more churches per square mile than any other country in the world.
  • Jamaica is the largest English-speaking island in the Caribbean Sea.
  • Most Jamaicans don’t use modern medicine techniques to treat their ailments. Instead, they focus on the healing power of food and nature.
  • Over 90% of Jamaica’s residents are of African descent. When slavery was abolished in 1834, a quarter million slaves were freed in Jamaica.
  • The “healing waters of Jamaica” are made up of several natural mineral baths and hot springs that are thought to have therapeutic properties.
  • Christopher Columbus first came to Jamaica on May 4, 1494 while on his second voyage to the “new” world and he named the island Santiago (in English, Saint James).
  • The island is divided into three counties and fourteen parishes. Each parish has a capital town which is the center of local Government administration.

Jamaica is an island that is located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Since gaining its independence from the United Kingdom in 1962, the country has grown to a population of 2.8 million people. Kingston, the capital, is home to approximately one million of the country’s inhabitants.

The official language of Jamaica is English because the United Kingdom ruled over the country for many centuries. However, the country also recognizes Jamaican Patois as its national language.

The currency is the Jamaican dollar, and its flag is comprised of three main colors. The colors of the Jamaican flag represent the following: Black stands for hardships, green stands for hope and agriculture, and yellow represents the wealth and beauty of the sun. Although Jamaica has no official religion and practices religious freedom, over 64% of Jamaicans are Protestant.

  • Most of the families in Jamaica are headed by women. Mothers are responsible for raising children and supporting their families. The family is of the utmost importance and includes a close-knit web of aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents.
  • Public education in Jamaica is not entirely free, as there are registration fees and other school expenses that are not covered by the government. As a result, many of the nation’s most poor children are not able to attend school.
  • The Jamaican Government is currently working with the UNDP and the European Union to alleviate poverty on both a macro and micro level. Poverty alleviation and achievement of Millennium Development Goals remains a top priority for the Jamaican government.
  • Jamaica’s economy is a mixed economy that focuses on agriculture, tourism, mining, and manufacturing. Over half of its economy comes from tourism.
  • Jamaica’s main agricultural exports include bananas, sugar, and coffee.
  • GDP per capita is $9,200 (2017).
  • Relationships between Jamaican officials and crime groups cause widespread corruption, which results in many of Jamaica’s problems. Corruption not only hurts law-abiding Jamaican citizens but makes foreign investors far more hesitant to get involved in the Jamaican industry.
  • Jamaicans drive on the left side of the road.
  • The country has more churches per square mile than any other country in the world.
  • Jamaica is the largest English-speaking island in the Caribbean Sea.
  • Most Jamaicans don’t use modern medicine techniques to treat their ailments. Instead, they focus on the healing power of food and nature.
  • Over 90% of Jamaica’s residents are of African descent. When slavery was abolished in 1834, a quarter million slaves were freed in Jamaica.
  • The “healing waters of Jamaica” are made up of several natural mineral baths and hot springs that are thought to have therapeutic properties.
  • Christopher Columbus first came to Jamaica on May 4, 1494 while on his second voyage to the “new” world and he named the island Santiago (in English, Saint James).
  • The island is divided into three counties and fourteen parishes. Each parish has a capital town which is the center of local Government administration.

Jamaica is an island that is located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Since gaining its independence from the United Kingdom in 1962, the country has grown to a population of 2.8 million people. Kingston, the capital, is home to approximately one million of the country’s inhabitants.

The official language of Jamaica is English because the United Kingdom ruled over the country for many centuries. However, the country also recognizes Jamaican Patois as its national language.

The currency is the Jamaican dollar, and its flag is comprised of three main colors. The colors of the Jamaican flag represent the following: Black stands for hardships, green stands for hope and agriculture, and yellow represents the wealth and beauty of the sun. Although Jamaica has no official religion and practices religious freedom, over 64% of Jamaicans are Protestant.

  • Most of the families in Jamaica are headed by women. Mothers are responsible for raising children and supporting their families. The family is of the utmost importance and includes a close-knit web of aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents.
  • Public education in Jamaica is not entirely free, as there are registration fees and other school expenses that are not covered by the government. As a result, many of the nation’s most poor children are not able to attend school.
  • The Jamaican Government is currently working with the UNDP and the European Union to alleviate poverty on both a macro and micro level. Poverty alleviation and achievement of Millennium Development Goals remains a top priority for the Jamaican government.
  • Jamaica’s economy is a mixed economy that focuses on agriculture, tourism, mining, and manufacturing. Over half of its economy comes from tourism.
  • Jamaica’s main agricultural exports include bananas, sugar, and coffee.
  • GDP per capita is $9,200 (2017).
  • Relationships between Jamaican officials and crime groups cause widespread corruption, which results in many of Jamaica’s problems. Corruption not only hurts law-abiding Jamaican citizens but makes foreign investors far more hesitant to get involved in the Jamaican industry.
  • Jamaicans drive on the left side of the road.
  • The country has more churches per square mile than any other country in the world.
  • Jamaica is the largest English-speaking island in the Caribbean Sea.
  • Most Jamaicans don’t use modern medicine techniques to treat their ailments. Instead, they focus on the healing power of food and nature.
  • Over 90% of Jamaica’s residents are of African descent. When slavery was abolished in 1834, a quarter million slaves were freed in Jamaica.
  • The “healing waters of Jamaica” are made up of several natural mineral baths and hot springs that are thought to have therapeutic properties.
  • Christopher Columbus first came to Jamaica on May 4, 1494 while on his second voyage to the “new” world and he named the island Santiago (in English, Saint James).
  • The island is divided into three counties and fourteen parishes. Each parish has a capital town which is the center of local Government administration.